5/30/12

UPDATE: Praying on Memorial Day... in Indianapolis



 H/T to Rock over at Whispers for reminding us that among his duties as apostolic administrator of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, Boston-bred Bishop Chris Coyne offers the prayer at the beginning of the Indianapolis 500 on Memorial Day.

Give a listen above for how Bishop Coyne led these more than 400,000 racing enthusiasts in prayer at the track.

Can I hear an Amen?

(There's always a link on my sidebar to Bishop Coyne's blog, Let Us Walk Together.)

UPDATE:  For Catholics who may not be satisfied with Bishop Coyne's style of prayer, perhaps they'd prefer the prayer offered last year by Pastor Joe Nelms at the NASCAR race!




 

     
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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Amen...that was awesome,

Anonymous said...

Fr. Fleming,

Nothing wrong with the bishop's prayer. I appreciate how he mentioned God and added,"God Bless America!" I believe you should not be afraid to mention God and Our Lord in your public prayers, which you did in your Memorial Day post. Praying to "the One" as you do seems too radical a departure for a Catholic pastor -- avoiding "God" and "Our Lord" in the name of political correctness. It doesn't matter that you pray in the name of Jesus at home in your own church; priests must bring Our Lord into the public square (or race track), just as Bishop Coyne did.

Mary

Anonymous said...

Pastor Joe Nelms's opening prayer was an absolute hoot at the Nashville NASCAR event!

I noticed that Bishop Chris Coyne was promoted to Cardinal by the Indy 500 female commentator. I thought his prayer was very appropriate for the crowd of 400,000 NASCAR fans he was addressing. I don't know if this is part of the New Evangelization, but all I can say is, AMEN, brother, go for it!

Rosemary

Cesare said...

I am a catholic, I used to sing in Vatican, now I live and work in Indiana, and I appreciated both the prayer (yes, maybe too much "show-like" for what I am used to, but never beyond the limits) and the response from the crowd: no one seemed to doubt that God exists, and I don't think anyone felt offended by that invocation.